“Cripping’ the Comic Con” Conference at Syracuse University

I am very excited to announce that I will be presenting a paper at the “Cripping’ the Comic Con 2014” convention April 9 & 10 at Syracuse University! The conference revolves around issues of disability and marginal identities especially within comics and popular culture. Check out the conference website: http://crippingthecon.com/

 

Read this! Noam Chomsky on Zombies as the New Indians and Slaves

http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2014/02/14/noam-chomsky-zombies-are-the-new-indians-and-slaves-in-white-americas-collective-nightmare/

“I think when you break it down,” Chomsky concluded, “much of it is just a recognition — at some level of the psyche — that if you’ve got your boot on somebody’s neck, there’s something wrong, and that they people you’re oppressing may rise up and defend themselves.”

Interesting to note how the walking dead originally takes place in Atlanta. The placement in the south is important. That is, the zombies overtake the city, or in Chomsky’s vain, the proletariat poor and racially oppressed rise up to swarm the metropolis of oppression. What more, they then move to a prison, and after that goes to hell, they move to a government sanctioned haven for congressmen and Washington elite (this is from the comic book, but I think the show is moving in that direction). I think Chomsky is spot on in his analysis.

Thanks to Bo Eberle for pointing me to this post.

Masculinity and The Joker in Greg Hunter’s Review of “Batman: Death of the Family”

Click to read: http://www.tcj.com/reviews/batman-death-of-the-family/#comment-596826

This is a great review/analysis of The Joker by Greg Hunter over at The Comics Journal. If you are vaguely interested in any of the Batman movies or comics, or if you enjoy the occasional pop culture critique, check it out. We need to rethink how we draw, write, think, and view (on-screen or on the page) evil and villainous characters. Hunter puts his finger on an important issue in the American cultural imagination surrounding masculinity and homosexuality.

Frank Miller’s depiction of The Joker in his acclaimed graphic novel, “The Dark Knight Returns.”

Would love to hear what you all think! Feel free to comment and start the conversation.